KNOXVILLE LATIN MASS COMMUNITY NEWSLETTER

 

MASS THIS SUNDAY (February 19, 2017)
Sexagesima Sunday

12:00 noon, Holy Ghost Church, Knoxville

     St. Edmund Campion Missal & Hymnal page numbers:

     Asperges Rite:  Asperges me  (567)

     Order of Mass:  Missalette or Campion Missal (569)

     Proper Prayers and Readings:  Mass leaflet or Campion Missal (85)

     Kyrie, (no Gloria), Credo III, Sanctus, Agnus Dei:  Mass XI Orbis factor (740)

     Preface of the Holy Trinity:  Mass leaflet or Campion Missal (598)

     Final Marian Antiphon:  Ave, Regina Caelorum (951)

3 pm, St. Therese of Lisieux Church, Cleveland

3 pm, St. Mary Church, Johnson City

 

MASS NEXT SUNDAY (February 26, 2017)
Quinquagesima Sunday

12:00 pm, Holy Ghost Church, Knoxville

3 pm, St. Joseph the Worker Church, Madisonville

5 pm, Basilica of Sts. Peter & Paul, Chattanooga

 

MONTHLY CONVIVIUM AFTER MASS TODAY

In recent years, we’ve had refreshments after Mass on first Sundays of the month. Starting this Sunday (February 19), the Knights of Columbus plan to host and provide food and drink—though potluck dishes are still welcome—for a convivium after the 12:00 noon Mass at Holy Ghost Church on the third Sunday of the month. So plan to stay after Mass for camaraderie and refreshments downstairs, and to express our appreciation to the Knights for inclusion of the 12 noon Mass in this parish program.

 

THE ANTIQUITY OF THE PROPERS OF THE TRADITIONAL LATIN MASS

The collect, secret, and postcommunion prayers for the three Sundays of the season of Septuagesima, as they are found today in the 1962 missal, are word-for-Latin-word identical with those in the Gregorian sacramentary used in the time of Charlemagne twelve hundred years ago. (Click here if you'd like to compare these propers on pages 25-26 of Charlemagne's sacramentary online, with the Latin propers in the Campion missal or in your own Latin-English hand missal.)

 

Indeed, these proper orations are thought to have already been several centuries old at the time of Charlemagne, dating back at least to the time of Pope Gregory the Great (before 600 AD). So those of us who attend the extraordinary form Mass of Sexagesima this Sunday will hear words hallowed by 12 to 15 centuries of continuous use in the liturgy of the Church. Though these pearls of Christian antiquity (along with the Sundays of Septuagesimatide themselves) are missing from the newer ordinary form missal and calendar.

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zz7eQa1BR7w/SYyIRbH1u2I/AAAAAAAAAHQ/snkgWssyh5I/s400/Sept.jpg      http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zz7eQa1BR7w/SZfYBq4VlpI/AAAAAAAAAHY/lm0LVbzjDA0/s400/Sexg.jpg      http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zz7eQa1BR7w/SZ13Ch0fosI/AAAAAAAAAHo/Iker52tC6F4/s400/Quin.jpg

From an old Latin missal in which every Mass was illustrated with its own figure

(Click each for a high-res version with more detail. Photo credit: The Saint Lawrence Press)

 

SEVENTY DAYS OF PREPARATION FOR EASTER,

THE SEVENTY YEAR  BABYLONIAN EXILE, AND

THE SEVEN AGES OF SALVATION HISTORY

Adapted from the Vultus Christi web site (here) of Silverstream Priory, a traditional Benedictine monastery in Ireland:

 

The Seventy Days Preceding Easter
Today is Sexagesima Sunday. In a week and a half our heads will be marked with the ashes of penitence. An approximately seventy-day period of preparation for Lent emerged in the liturgy of the early centuries of Christianity. The three Sundays preceding Ash Wednesday were called Septuagesima, Sexagesima, and Quinquagesima, referring figuratively to the 70th (septua-), 60th (sexa-), and 50th (quinqua-) days before Easter. The First Sunday of Lent is, of course, Quadragesima, the beginning of the Lenten fast of forty (quadra-) days.

 

The Seventy Year Exile of the Jews
The (approximately) seventy-day period that begins with Septuagesima recalls the seventy-year Babylonian exile of the children of Israel, when they sat by the waters of Babylon and wept (cf. Ps 136:1) looking to their return from captivity home to Jerusalem, just as we now wait seventy days for our return to the heavenly Jerusalem of the Resurrection.

 

The Seven Ages of History
The ancient Church fathers divided the history of the world into seven ages:

 

·         From the creation of the world to the flood

·         From the renewal after the flood to the call of Abraham

·         From the covenant with Abraham to the call of Moses

·         From Moses to King David

·         From the reign of David to the Babylonian exile

·         From the return from captivity to the birth of Christ

·         From the first coming of Christ to His second coming

 

The Pastoral Wisdom of the Season of Septuagesima
The traditional Roman Rite marks Septuagesima Sunday by putting away the Alleluia; the Gloria is omitted and, already, the priest dons violet vestments in preparation for Lent. So begins a kind of three-week countdown before Ash Wednesday, lest Lent come upon us like a thief in the night and find us asleep and ill-prepared.

 

ONLINE WEEKLY LATIN MASS NEWSLETTER
To receive a weekly notice of the Latin Mass newsletter when it is posted. . . . Just send your name and e-mail address to  h.edwards@mindspring.com  or write them on a Knoxville Latin Mass Community envelope and leave it on a missalette table after Mass. The posted e-mail version has live internet links, and usually includes photos or other additional content that doesn't fit in the printed version.  

 

www.KnoxLatinMass.net